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Boston Red Sox Hats

Boston Red Sox hats are also very popular outside of the baseball world because of the simple but beautiful B logo. The success of the Red Sox in the field has increased this popularity. Boston Red Sox caps belong in every hats collection.

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The Boston Red Sox are one of the most famous sports teams thanks to their history and have a worldwide fan base. Founded in 1901, the team was one of the founders of the Major League. In 1900, the move to Boston followed, where the Red Sox were first seen on the field under the names Boston Americans and Boston Pilgrims. The current name is nevertheless a tradition. For as early as 1907, the team was renamed the Boston Red Sox. The name originated from the red pants the team wore. It was introduced by media in Chicago, who were looking for a short and concise name. In Boston, they fell back on this designation and made it the official name. In the early 20th century, the team had its golden age. In 1903, it won the first official World Series. More national titles followed in 1912, 1915, 1916 and 1918 led by the best baseball player of all time, Babe Ruth. On Dec. 26, 1919, the owner at the time, Harry Frazee, decided to sell Babe Ruth to the New York Yankees. This deal not only changed the history of baseball in Boston and New York, it kicked off one of the greatest rivalries in US sports. In the years following the switch, the Red Sox lost other top players in Joe Dugan and Herb Pennock. This caused them to slip into sporting irrelevance for many years.

Rise of the Boston Red Sox

. It would be 28 years before Boston made it to the World Series again in 1946. Led by franchise legend Ted Williams, however, they still lost 3-4 to the St. Louis Cardinals despite leading 3-2 after games. This luckless fate was to repeat itself several times in the course of history. That's why they found their own name for it: Curse of the Bambino, based on the nickname of Babe Ruth. In 1949, the Boston Red Sox, led by manager Joe McCarthy, needed a two-game win over the New York Yankees to advance to the World Series. McCarthy previously led the Yankees to seven World Series titles. The Red Sox, on the other hand, lost both games and missed the finals. In 1975, the team was in the World Series again. Against the Cincinnati Reds, it battled back from a 3-6 deficit in Game 6 - considered one of the greatest games of all time - to even the series. The curse seemed broken - at the latest when the Red Sox led 3-0 in Game 7. Still, the baseball god showed no mercy and they squandered the lead, losing Game 7 and the World Series 3-4. There were to be many more similarly painful moments: Such as losing the lead in the 1986 World Series or losing to the New York Yankees in 2003 in the American League Championship Series (ALCS).

Fans performed a wide variety of superstitious rituals to finally break the curse. It would ultimately take 86 years - until 2004 - before it was truly broken. In one of the greatest postseason series in baseball history, they turned around an 0-3 series deficit in the ALCS against the New York Yankees. Led by Red Sox legend David Ortiz, they turned around already hopeless deficits in Game 4 and Game 5. They reached the World Series and were able to pick up the last of four needed wins against their opponent, the St. Louis Cardinals, on Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2004. That sweep - and the World Series title that came with it - broke the Bambino's curse. In the years that followed, the Boston Red Sox reached the World Series three more times (2007, 2013 and 2018), winning each one.

Team with tradition

. The Boston Red Sox are baseball history. That's not only because of their own storied history, but also because of your ball park. Fenway Park, with its opening in 1912, is currently the oldest still-active stadium in Major League Baseball. Built in the Fenway-Kenmore neighborhood, it has been renovated over the years and now seats about 37,000 spectators. Particularly striking is the high green wall in the left outfield, which also went down in history as the Green Monster. Since 1934, there has been a scoreboard there, which is still operated manually today. Already in front of the stadium one notices the Boston Red Sox slogan and the famous logo of the red socks. This is very popular among fans as an alternate logo. At least as famous is the plain red B, which can be seen not only on the official on-field caps, but is also very popular outside the sport. Throughout their long history, the Boston Red Sox have always managed to find, train and retain new talent. The best examples of this are Dustin Pedroia and Carlton Fisk, among others. To keep this process going, the minor league teams consisting of the Worcester Red Sox, Portland Sea Dogs, Greenville Drive and Salem Red Sox take care of new talent.

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